Demand for engineers in Maine continues to rise as high-tech industries, construction, manufacturing and other employers expand. In fact, there is a projected shortfall of engineers over the next decade.

The University of Southern Maine’s engineering program is responding to the need and proving that its graduates are ready for the challenge and to enter Maine’s workforce.

USM currently enrolls about 200 engineering students. That’s about twice the size the program was a decade ago. Three recent graduates shared stories about their jobs and their experience in USM’s engineering program.


Julie Doxsey ’13

Julie Doxsey ’13

“As a software engineer at Tyler Technologies, I work with a range of technologies to support and develop software that meets the needs of a dynamic client base. The best part of my job is that I am constantly solving puzzles and working with a great group of people to figure out the best way to answer a request or fix a problem.

“I love to learn, and I find software engineering an exciting (and sometimes daunting) field. The more I learn, the more I realize that there is always more to know.

“My time at USM prepared me very well for my current position, even though I majored in mechanical engineering and am now writing software! I’ve found that engineering methodologies are useful no matter what task you are trying to tackle.

“The most valuable skill I learned at USM was the ability to teach myself new things. My time at USM also gave me the confidence I need to take on assignments or positions that I am not totally prepared for – which I also think is the best way to grow.”


Emily Donovan ’16

Emily Donovan ’16

“I work as an automation engineer in the operations engineering department at IDEXX Laboratories. One of the aspects I enjoy most about my job is the variety of tasks I get to perform. Some of these include designing/working with parts and assemblies in solid works, performing experiments to develop new products, analyzing processes, procedures and steps necessary to manufacture products, and working with vendors to build new equipment.

“Every day is different – but equally exciting! Above all, I enjoy being a part of a great group that relies on collaboration and hard work to get things done.

“I had a very positive experience in the USM Engineering Department. The professors were approachable and allowed students to benefit from using them as a resource for knowledge and advice. The lab portion of most courses and the junior/senior design courses provide a great opportunity for students for hands-on/real-life experience.

“Students are encouraged to apply for local internships, and as a junior, I was fortunate enough to get one at a great company. Getting this experience and exposure to real-life engineering is a great advantage when graduating and looking to enter the workforce.”


Matthew Araujo ’15

Matthew Araujo ’15

“I work as an engineer for one of the world’s top semiconductor companies – right here in Maine.

“At Texas Instruments we design and manufacture chips for everything from automobiles to cell phones. Working in an international company, I get to collaborate with experts, scientists and engineers from all over the world on projects that demand innovation. I’m encouraged to be curious and to develop creative solutions to technical and complex issues.

“For me, the best thing about my career is that every day brings new and interesting challenges. USM’s location in Maine’s largest city made it easy for me to reach out and make connections with local high-tech industries while seeking internships. When my summer internship was successful, it was easy to extend the internship into my senior year. I went into my senior year with a job offer already accepted.

“I apply the mathematics, science, engineering and communication skills I acquired as a student at USM. Success in my career requires that I continue to learn and seek knowledge independently. My education laid a foundation of knowledge that I continue to build upon as I develop professionally.”

 

This story first appeared in USM Connects magazine, produced by the University of Southern Maine.