January 8, 2013

Company claims victory over bread mold

Betsy Blaney / The Associated Press

(Continued from page 1)

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Don Stull, chief executive officer of Microzap Inc., places a loaf of bread inside a patented microwave that kills mold spores.

AP

A patent is pending on the technology, Stull said, adding that they're in talks with investors. The U.S. Department of Agriculture also has contacted MicroZap about possibly using the technology for exported fruits and vegetables.

Stull said MicroZap has just completed drawings for an in-home unit, so that consumers could treat bread and other foods themselves. He estimated an in-home unit would cost about $100 more than a regular microwave.

Microwaving bread is not the same as irradiation — a technique that kills food pathogens — as no gamma rays are used. The U.S. government has approved irradiation for a variety of foods — meat, spices, certain imported fruits, the seeds used to grow sprouts. It does not make the food radioactive.

The microwaves used in the university lab are the same frequency as commercial units, but delivered in an array that gets a homogenous signal to the bread, eliminating the hot and cold spots common when heating food in kitchen microwaves.

The technology — an effort funded by $1.5 million from Texas' Emerging Technology Fund — was initially intended to kill bacteria such as MRSA, a contagious bacterial infection that's resistant to many commonly used antibiotics, and salmonella. But researchers discovered it also killed mold spores in bread and sterilized fresh or processed foods without cooking or damaging them.

While bread manufacturers have expressed interest in the technology, there's concern it could push up the price in an industry with already tight margins.

"I think the consumers are going to drive this more than companies," Stull said.

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