February 25

Mexican drug kingpin to fight extradition to U.S.

A judge in Mexico will decide by Tuesday whether to release ‘El Chapo’ or start the process of bringing him to trial there.

By Mark Stevenson, Alicia A. Caldwell And Adriana Gomez Licon
The Associated Press

MEXICO CITY – Mexican authorities have set in motion a legal process that makes it unlikely drug kingpin Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman will soon face U.S. cases also pending against him.

click image to enlarge

Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman

The Associated Press

click image to enlarge

An interconnected tunnel in the city’s drainage system that infamous drug boss Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman used to evade authorities is shown in the city of Culiacan, Mexico, on Sunday.

The Associated Press

Additional Photos Below

Related headlines

The Federal Judicial Council said the hemisphere's most powerful drug lord had been formally charged under a 2009 Mexican indictment for cocaine trafficking, an action that could start put him on path for a trial that would put any extradition request on the back burn.

A judge has until Tuesday to decide whether a trial is warranted. Guzman, who is being held in a maximum security prison west of Mexico City, could then appeal the judge's decision, a process that typically takes weeks or months.

Also on Monday, Guzman's lawyers filed a petition asking a court for an injunction to block any extradition request from the United States. In the past, similar appeals by other drug suspects have taken months, and sometimes years, to resolve.

And before considering any extradition request that might come from the U.S., Mexican officials also must weigh whether to renew other charges against Guzman. When he escaped from a Mexican prison in 2001 he was serving convictions for criminal association and bribery, and he was awaiting trial on charges of murder and drug trafficking.

What to do with Guzman is a politically sensitive subject for President Enrique Pena Nieto, who has sought to carve out more control over joint anti-drug efforts with the United States. Analysts said his administration is likely torn between the impulse to move Guzman to a nearly invulnerable U.S. facility and the desire to show that Mexico can successful retry and incarcerate the man whose time as the fugitive head of the world's most powerful drug cartel.

Eduardo Sanchez, the presidential spokesman, did not answer his phone or return messages Monday asking whether the government was considering extraditing Guzman to the U.S.

Prominent trial lawyer Juan Velasquez, who has represented former Mexican presidents, said that if the administration did decide to extradite Guzman, legal appeals would only delay the process because Mexico has removed obstacles to sending its citizens for trial in other countries.

"If the United States asks for a Mexican to be extradited, that Mexican, sooner rather than later, will wind up extradited," said Velasquez, who is not involved in the Guzman case.

U.S. Justice Department spokesman Peter Carr said Monday that extradition "will be the subject of further discussion between the United States and Mexico."

And before making an extradition request, the U.S. government has to sort out where it would want to try Guzman, who faces charges in at least seven U.S. jurisdictions.

"You want number one to be the best shot that you have," said David Weinstein, a former assistant U.S. attorney in the Southern District of Florida in Miami who helped prosecute several high-profile suspected drug traffickers in his 11 years in the office. "What do they say? If you shoot at the king, you make sure you hit him in the head."

Many in Mexico see extradition as the best way to punish Guzman and break up his empire, given the United States' more certain legal system and better investigation capacities.

"The only option that would allow for dismantling this criminal network is extradition, and that's unfortunate," said Edgardo Buscaglia, an expert on the cartel and a senior research scholar at Colombia University. "Because, in the end, extraditions are an escape valve for Mexico," which has been slow to improve its own investigative police, prosecution and court system.

(Continued on page 2)

Were you interviewed for this story? If so, please fill out our accuracy form

Send question/comment to the editors


Additional Photos

click image to enlarge

One of the properties that was interconnected by tunnels in the city’s drainage system that infamous drug boss Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman used to evade authorities is shown in Culiacan, Mexico, on Sunday.

The Associated Press

  


Further Discussion

Here at PressHerald.com we value our readers and are committed to growing our community by encouraging you to add to the discussion. To ensure conscientious dialogue we have implemented a strict no-bullying policy. To participate, you must follow our Terms of Use.

Questions about the article? Add them below and we’ll try to answer them or do a follow-up post as soon as we can. Technical problems? Email them to us with an exact description of the problem. Make sure to include:
  • Type of computer or mobile device your are using
  • Exact operating system and browser you are viewing the site on (TIP: You can easily determine your operating system here.)