January 12, 2013

Saudi king gives first women seats on council

But they must wear full face coverings and be 'committed to Islamic Shariah disciplines.'

The Associated Press

RIYADH, Saudi Arabia - Saudi Arabia's king granted women seats on the country's top advisory council for the first time on Friday, giving them a long-awaited toehold in the ultraconservative kingdom's male-dominated political system.

Abdullah bin Abdul Aziz al-Saud
click image to enlarge

King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia, shown in 2009, still appears to be treading carefully to avoid angering powerful clerics.

The Associated Press

King Abdullah's decrees come against the backdrop of heavy restrictions on women, who are not allowed to travel, work, study abroad, marry, get divorced or gain admittance to a public hospital without permission from a male guardian. Recently, airport authorities were instructed to send text messages to the phones of male guardians -- husbands, fathers or brothers -- with information about the movements of their wives, daughters or sisters.

"The decision is good but women issues are still hanging," said Wajeha al-Hawidar, a prominent Saudi female activist. "For normal women, there are so many laws and measures that must be suspended or amended for women to be dealt with as grown-ups and adults, without a mandate from guardians."

But she said that having female members of the council could help to change the image of women in society.

"Men can finally respect women when they see them playing a male role," she said.

The nation's official news agency said the king issued two royal decrees granting women 30 seats on the Shura Council, which has 150 members plus a president. The council reviews laws and questions ministers, but does not have legislative powers. All members are appointed by the king and serve four-year terms.

Since 2006, women have been appointed only as advisers.

The king has made incremental steps toward reform but appeared to be treading carefully to avoid angering powerful clerics, among them the country's grand mufti who most recently spoke out against the mixing of genders last week. In modern Saudi Arabia, which is the birthplace of Islam and the home of its holiest sites, the governing Al Saud family supports the clerics and the clerics support the family's rule.

According to the decrees, the female council members must be "committed to Islamic Shariah disciplines without any violations" and be "restrained by the religious veil." The veil in Saudi Arabia typically refers to a full face covering, also known as a niqab.

The decrees also specified the women will be entering the council building from special gates, will sit in reserved seats and pray in segregated areas.

The Inter-Parliamentary Union commended the move as "another step forward" for women's rights in Saudi Arabia.

 

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