Feb. 6, 1899
After being incorporated as a city in 1892, Deering is annexed by Portland, swelling the city’s population by 7,500. (Wikipedia; “Creating Portland,” Joseph Conforti.)
Dozens of tongues
Students at Deering High School speak more than 50 languages at home, and come from more than 30 countries. (dhs.portlandschools.org.)
‘City of Homes’
The Odd Fellows published this pamphlet on Deering in 1897. (“Deering: A Social and Architectural History,” by William David Barry and Patricia McGraw Anderson.)
5th annual, coming up
Porchfest, which features musicians playing on a number of neighborhood porches, is scheduled for Sunday, Sept. 9, from 1-5 p.m.
Since 1929
Roy’s Shoe Shop on Stevens Avenue has been rehabbing shoes.
Rings, but no ring
The Gothic-design 1902 Wilde Memorial Chapel in Evergreen Cemetery is available for weddings, but the bell cannot be rung. (portlandmaine.gov.)
1937
Saw the opening of Maine’s first osteopathic hospital, at the corner of Pleasant Avenue and Matthews Street. The 1910 building is now condominiums.
29.5 acres
In 1946, Gov. Percival Baxter presented Portland with Baxter Woods, named for his father, former mayor James Phinney Baxter.
‘Crowds of 10,000’
Presumpscot Park, which was behind today’s Deering High, was a trotting track that opened in 1875 and had a “base-ball grounds in the center.” (“Deering: A Social and Architectural History,” by William David Barry and Patricia McGraw Anderson.)
Local buzz
In the spring, The Honey Exchange offers three-pound packages of Russian hybrid queens. This year’s bees have sold out, though. (thehoneyexchange.com.)
$60 million (est.) man
Born in Italy, Donald Della Valle opened a tiny “beer parlor” at Woodfords Corner in the early 1930s, the start of the Valle’s Steak House chain. He died a wealthy man in 1977. (“Deering: A Social and Architectural History,” by William David Barry and Patricia McGraw Anderson.)

On the Market in and around Deering Center