BOSTON — Red Sox left-hander Chris Sale is receiving treatment for inflammation in his elbow that will shut him down for the rest of the regular season, another blow to the defending World Series champions whose postseason hopes appear all but dashed.

Orthopedist Dr. James Andrews gave Sale an injection of platelet-rich plasma on Monday and said he will be re-evaluated in six weeks.

Looking beyond this frustrating season, the treatment could be good news for the club, which feared Sale might need Tommy John surgery. That would likely have cost him the 2020 season.

Boston was off Monday and was 6½ games out of a wild card spot.

The 30-year-old Sale was coming off two solid starts in which he combined for 25 strikeouts — including the 2,000th of his career – and allowed only three runs in 14 2/3 innings.

Sale, a seven-time All-Star in his 10th season, was the fastest to reach 2,000 strikeouts in major league history.

Last season, Sale dealt with shoulder soreness after the All-Star break, limiting him to 29 innings.

He was also limited in the postseason, but closed out the World Series by striking out then-Los Angeles Dodgers infielder Manny Machado to clinch Boston’s fourth title in 15 seasons.

Sale signed a six-year, $160 million contract in March that includes $50 million in deferred money.

Sale never shied away from responsibility for his struggles this year. His velocity was down in April, and he took the loss in five of his first six starts.

“I’m struggling and I don’t know if I’ve really pitched like this in my life,” Sale said after a loss to Toronto on April 9. “It’s a tough spot to be in. But I’ve got guys up here fighting and I’ve got to keep fighting. There’s no giving up. If something’s not working, you got to go to something else.”

AL JACKSON, a tough left-hander who provided a rare glint of hope in the early days of the woebegone New York Mets, died at 83 in a nursing home at Port St. Lucie, Florida, after a long illness.

Jackson worked for the Mets for 50 years as a pitcher, major league coach, minor league pitching coordinator and front-office adviser.

Jackson pitched in the majors for 10 seasons, and none was more challenging than 1962, when the expansion Mets entered the majors and lost 120 games. “Little” Al Jackson, although he was 5-foot-10, had a record of 8-20 and 4.40 ERA. The next two years he went 13-17 and 11-16.

Jackson was traded to the St. Louis Cardinals in 1966 for Ken Boyer. He joined the majors with Pittsburgh in 1959 and for his career went 67-99 with a 3.98 ERA. He later was pitching coach for the Boston Red Sox and Baltimore Orioles.

NATIONALS: Pitcher Max Scherzer is expected to come off the injured list to start Thursday against Pittsburgh.

Scherzer, a three-time Cy Young Award winner, had a bullpen session Monday. A smiling Scherzer said “See you Thursday,” as he walked by a group of reporters.

Scherzer has been on the injured list for most of the past six weeks because of a strained muscle in his back. His lone start in that span was July 25, when he allowed three runs in five innings in a no-decision against Colorado.

Scherzer is 9-5 with a 2.41 ERA in 20 starts. His 12.7 strikeouts per nine innings leads the NL.

BRAVES: Atlanta claimed outfielder Billy Hamilton off waivers from Kansas City to bolster its injury-plagued roster.

Hamilton, 28, is a five-time Gold Glove finalist and switch hitter who gives Atlanta defensive options and speed off the bench. He played in 93 games for the Royals, hitting .211 with 18 stolen bases.

Hamilton spent six years with the Reds before signing with Kansas City as a free agent this season. He’s a career .242 hitter with 295 stolen bases, including four straight seasons with more than 50 steals in Cincinnati.

The Braves also announced that right-handed reliever Wes Parsons was claimed off waivers by Colorado. Atlanta designated him for assignment last week.

TWINS: Nelson Cruz was reinstated from the injured list after the minimum 10-day stay and will play through a ruptured tendon in his left wrist.

Cruz ruptured the tendon Aug. 8 and the Twins feared he would miss significant time. But the team later learned he could play with the injury, and he’s said he’s pain-free.

“We haven’t really had a hint of a discussion related to discomfort, related to anything associated with his wrist,” Manager Rocco Baldelli said. “He’s seemingly in great shape. He’s ready to play. He’s been adamant about that.”


Comments are not available on this story.