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Maine’s lobster industry struggles with heroin

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    Maine’s lobster industry struggles with heroin - Staff Photo by Gregory Rec | of | Share this photo

    Joshua Kane, foreground, and Mark Pinkham offload lobster while docked at Cranberry Isles Fishermen's Co-Op on Little Cranberry Island. Kane, a 32-year-old lobster-fishing apprentice, is a former opioid addict who encourages other fishermen to seek treatment and talks openly about his own addictions.

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    Maine’s lobster industry struggles with heroin - Staff photo by Gregory Rec | of | Share this photo

    Snow-covered lobster traps sit on a dock in Jonesport.

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    Ben Crocker Sr., right, and Tristen Nelson repair lobster buoys in Crocker's shop in Bucks Harbor last month. Nelson, a 35-year-old Machias lobsterman who kicked a 20-year heroin habit last year, says: "All those years I didn't even realize that I had the best job in the world. ... What a waste."

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    Maine’s lobster industry struggles with heroin - Staff photo by Gregory Rec | of | Share this photo

    Josh Kane and Mark Pinkham offload lobster while docked on Islesford. Kane is a former addict who encourages other fishermen to seek recovery treatment.

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    Maine’s lobster industry struggles with heroin - Staff photo by Gregory Rec | of | Share this photo

    Tristen Nelson says a prayer with other church members during a service at the Machias Christian Fellowship church. Nelson works as a sternman aboard a lobster boat and went through the Arise recovery program for heroin addiction.

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    Maine’s lobster industry struggles with heroin - Staff photo by Gregory Rec | of | Share this photo

    A parishoner walks out the door of the Machias Christian Fellowship church as Pastor Aaron Dudley, back to camera at right, talks to men in the lobby. The church supports a faith-based addiction recovery program in Machias called Arise.

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    Maine’s lobster industry struggles with heroin - Staff photo by Gregory Rec | of | Share this photo

    Paul Trovarello, a former lobsterman and addict who now runs a church and a faith-based drug recovery program in Machias, talks on his cellphone. Trovarello has made a name for himself with addicts' families, tracking their loved ones down in drug dens across Washington County and offering them a place in his rehab program.

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    Maine’s lobster industry struggles with heroin - Staff photo by Brianna Soukup | of | Share this photo

    Tyler Ragone, front center, bows his head as he listens to Weston Kochendoerfer talk about his addiction to opiates and his path to recovery during a community meeting at Machias Christian Fellowship. Ragone, 19, and originally from New Jersey, is in the Arise program.

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    Maine’s lobster industry struggles with heroin - Staff photo by Gregory Rec | of | Share this photo

    Vehicles pass over the bridge between Jonesport and Beals Island.

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    Maine’s lobster industry struggles with heroin - Staff photo by Brianna Soukup | of | Share this photo

    VJ Lenfestey, left, of Addison and Wayne Woodman of Machias pray together. Both men belong to Machias Christian Fellowship and often help out with the Arise program.

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    Maine’s lobster industry struggles with heroin - Staff photo by Gregory Rec | of | Share this photo

    Men at the Arise house eat lunch and dinner together and rotate through cooking and cleaning duties.

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    Maine’s lobster industry struggles with heroin - Staff photo by Gregory Rec | of | Share this photo

    Work, including shoveling snow along Elm Street, is a key component of the Arise recovery program.

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    Maine’s lobster industry struggles with heroin - Staff photo by Gregory Rec | of | Share this photo

    The sun's rays shine around a dark cloud over Jonesport Harbor.

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    Maine’s lobster industry struggles with heroin - Staff photo by Gregory Rec | of | Share this photo

    Kristin Seeley holds her son Lucca. His father, Sam Stevens, had returned home from a residential treatment program in Florida to attend the birth of his son, but he died of a heroin overdose two weeks before Lucca was born.

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